Foreign embassies are symbolic of the fascinating idea that you enter a jurisdiction where different laws apply the moment you step through their doors (or, in the case of the American embassy, pass the fence). Sagas like Julian Assange's refuge in the Ecuadorian embassy keep alive embassies' mystique and the orderly image of a world divided into distinct national territories still dominates our collective imagination – to the degree that it can be counterintuitive to think of territories without thinking of nations. However, the work published in this journal in its first five years has demonstrated – through theoretical reflection and empirical research – that territories are shifting in important ways. 

Several articles in this issue illustrate how the construction of territories beyond, within, and between nations is crucial for understanding exploitation and extraction as well as resistance and contention. This includes Saskia Sassen's Annual Lecture, Embedded borderings: making new geographies of centrality, which is currently freely available to online readers along with the editorial introducing the rest of the issue.

You can read the whole issue here: http://rsa.tandfonline.com/toc/rtep20/6/1?nav=tocList 

This new issue contains the following articles: 

Editorial

The territorial lens: operational spaces of extraction and resistance – Justus Uitermark – FREE ACCESS

Annual Lecture 

Embedded borderings: making new geographies of centrality – Saskia Sassen – FREE ACCESS

Articles

A new regional geography of a revolution: Bosnia’s Plenum movement  – James Riding

‘No sovereign nation, no reservation’: producing the new colonialism in Cayuga Count(r)y – Kenneth Wolkin & Joseph Nevins

The biopolitics and geopolitics of border enforcement in Melilla – Corey Johnson & Reece Jones

Urban development and the politics of dissonance – Nicholas A. Phelps & Dave Valler

Party integration at the grassroots: evidence from Canada – Scott Pruysers

Austerity states, institutional dismantling and the governance of sub-national economic development: the demise of the regional development agencies in England – Andy Pike, Mike Coombes, Peter O’Brien & John Tomaney

News – RSA Awards notice