Posted on: 10 January, 2019
Application deadline: February 6, 2019

Two PhD scholarships: Environmental justice 1) Climate justice, 2) Women environmental defenders,ICTA UAB, Barcelona, Spain

Here two funded research projects: 1) “Climate justice, carbon budget and unburnable fossil fuels reserves ” with Federico Demaria 2) “Women environmental defenders – victims of violence (a study based on and and contributing to the EJAtlas)” with Joan Martinez Alier

Deadline: 6th February 2019. Don’t miss it!

Find all the offers here: https://hosts.lacaixafellowships.org/finder

NB This is a programme for natural sciences (more than social sciences), but if you get the scholarship, there is some flexibility on the research topic. So, in my case, it is a project about climate justice, in relation to alternatives to development from post-development to the pluriverse).

https://obrasociallacaixa.org/en/investigacion-y-becas/programa-de-becas-de-posgrado/inphinit/programme-description?fbclid=IwAR0t0wx7efakhEx4Hdc0CuCbNcFCDzXLTYTgz7irbArA0vq1J1taLqiRp1A

 

INFORMATION CALL 2019 DOCTORAL INPhINIT FELLOWSHIPS PROGRAMME – INCOMING FRAME

PhD POSITION OFFER 1

Position

  1. Project Title/ Job Position title: PhD on carbon budget and Unburnable fossil fuels reserves
  2. Area of Knowledge:
  • Physical Sciences, Mathematics and Engineering
  • Group of disciplines: Geology, Earth Sciences, Environmental and Atmosphere Sciences, Mines, Geological Engineering, Oceanography, Hydrology

LIFE SCIENCES

Medicine, Public Health, Sport Sciences, Nutrition, Clinical Psychology, Health Management
Animal, Plant, Environmental Biology, Physiology, Ecology and Conservation
Human Biology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Genetics, Cellular Biology, Genomics and Proteomics, Biochemistry
Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Animal Production, Forestry
Biotechnology, Bioinformatics, Pharmacy, Food Technology

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING

Theoretical and Applied Mathematics, Computer Sciences
Physics
Geology, Earth Sciences, Environmental and Atmosphere Sciences, Mines, Geological Engineering, Oceanography, Hydrology
Civil and Construction Engineering, Energy, Nuclear Energy and Renewable Energy Engineering
Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
Telecommunications, Electronics, Robotics, Biomedical Engineering, Automation Engineering, ICT
Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgy, Materials, Nanotechnology, Aeronautical, Naval and Aerospace Engineering

 

Research project/ Research Group description (màx. 2.000 caràcters)

How much more of Earth’s fossil fuels can we extract and burn in the short- to medium-term future and still avoid severe global warming? An article in Nature argues that most of the world’s fossil fuel reserves has to be left in the ground, unburned, to keep global temperature rise to no more than 2°C (Jakob and Hilaire, 2015). This is what is meant by ‘unburnable fuels’ and it relates directly with research by climate science about ‘carbon budgets’ (Kevin Anderson and Alice Bows Larkin 2011).

An initial study in 2013 by the Carbon Tracker and Grantham Institute (Imperial College – LSE) had compared the known global fossil fuel reserves (coal, oil and gas) with the carbon budget. They estimated that if all of the world’s reserves of fossil fuels were burned, 2,860 billion tonnes of CO2 would be emitted to the atmosphere (so called ‘carbon bubble’, see : carbonbubble.info). This was more than 2.5 times greater than the allowed budget for a likely increase of 2ºC. In other words, the present speed of taking fossil fuels from the ground and burning them might have to be slowed down.

If carbon capture technology does not prove effective and the needed rapid decarbonisation implies that fossil fuels reserves have to be left unburned, what would be the implications in terms of climate policies? How should this proposal be operationalized and implemented?

In Nature Christophe McGlade and Paul Ekins (2015) at University College London examined further the implications of the carbon budget for the use of fossil fuels. They used an economic optimisation method: how to gain the most economic value from the limited amount of coal, oil and gas that can be burned, and in what regions. This analysis estimates that 88% of global coal reserves, 52% of gas reserves and 35% of oil reserves are unburnable and must be left in the ground. Such precision in the numbers by type of fuels is somewhat questionable, and this research project wants to explore different scenarios.

 

Job position description (màx. 2.000 caràcters)

The proposed PhD thesis will critically assess the implications of the carbon budget for the use of fossil fuels, exploring the notion of “unburnable fuels” in relation to climate policies. Instead of an economic optimization method (comparing costs and benefits of leaving fossil fuels in the ground in specific locations) we propose a multi-criteria approach. In the absence of additional carbon absorption capacity in land and the oceans, leaving fossil fuels in the ground makes sense. However, what type of fuels (gas, oil and coal) should be left unburned? How much? Where? When? How?

In recent years the notion of a ‘carbon budget’ has entered the lexicon of climate science (e.g. IPCC, 2013; Meinshausen et al, 2009). Although the science underpinning the carbon budget is increasingly robust (see Le Quere et al, 2013), some scientists, politicians, and the broader public have been slow to recognize its socio-economic and political implications. The higher the probability of limiting warming to no more than 2°C, the more stringent the budget and the stronger the position of the idea of leaving fossil fuels in the ground (Climate Council, 2015). According to the IPPC report (2013), the world’s carbon budget could be entirely used up within 15-25 years, a scenario that could lock the world into a future 4°C or 6°C degrees warmer (Christoff, 2013; Potsdam Institute, 2012). The consequences and risks of the current ‘business as usual’ scenario highlight the urgency with which deep decarbonisation must take place. Nevertheless, how should the decarbonisation take place? The contribution from this PhD project is that instead of focusing only on negotiations between countries, it takes a commodity chain perspective: from extraction of fossil fuels to transport to final burning, focusing on the awareness and actions at the local level preventing damage from fossil fuels extraction (or fossil fuel burning) that make a quantifiable significant contribution against climate change.

Group Leader

  1. Title: Dr.
  2. Full name: Federico Demaria
  3. Email: federicodemaria@gmail.com
  4. Research project/ Research Group website (Url): http://envjustice.org/
  5. Website description: EnvJustice research project, funded by the European Research Council.
  6. Url: http://ictaweb.uab.cat/
  7. Website description: Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Autonomous University of Barcelona

 

 

INFORMATION CALL 2019: DOCTORAL INPhINIT FELLOWSHIPS PROGRAMME – INCOMING FRAME

PhD POSITION OFFER 2

Position

  1. Project Title/ Job Position title: Women environmental defenders – victims of violence (a study based on and and contributing to the EJAtlas)
  2. Area of Knowledge: (choose one option)
  • Life Sciences or Physical Sciences, Mathematics and Engineering
  • Group of disciplines: (choose one option) Public Health and Ecology and Conservation

LIFE SCIENCES

Medicine, Public Health, Sport Sciences, Nutrition, Clinical Psychology, Health Management
Animal, Plant, Environmental Biology, Physiology, Ecology and Conservation
Human Biology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Genetics, Cellular Biology, Genomics and Proteomics, Biochemistry
Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Animal Production, Forestry
Biotechnology, Bioinformatics, Pharmacy, Food Technology

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING

Theoretical and Applied Mathematics, Computer Sciences
Physics
Geology, Earth Sciences, Environmental and Atmosphere Sciences, Mines, Geological Engineering, Oceanography, Hydrology
Civil and Construction Engineering, Energy, Nuclear Energy and Renewable Energy Engineering
Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
Telecommunications, Electronics, Robotics, Biomedical Engineering, Automation Engineering, ICT
Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgy, Materials, Nanotechnology, Aeronautical, Naval and Aerospace Engineering

 

Research project/ Research Group description (màx. 2.000 caràcters)

The topic of Women victimized in Environmental Conflicts is under-researched, covered to a small extent in work by members of the EnvJustice team (Martínez-Alier et al, 2018) (ERC Adv. Grant 2016-21). The EJAtlas is a world inventory of environmental conflicts, which will grow to 3000 cases by Dec. 2019. Very relevant for the fields of Ecology and Conservation, Public Health. It allows studies in comparative political ecology on a variety of transversal topics (such as women victimized in various ways in environmental conflicts).

Methodology. First, filter out in the EJAtlas cases of women environmental leaders, and select the cases of deadly violence against them. This might give a sample of 50 women worldwide. Compare with the Global Witness reports of killings of environmental defenders. However, violence does not imply only killing people. There is a pyramid of violence involving the wounded and the frightened. There is also the “structural violence” of persistent environmental injustices and the “slow violence” of toxic pollution of water sources or the soils. Women’s (and children’s) health is affected in many conflicts recorded included in the EJAtlas. This remains to be researched. Women victimized in environmental conflicts have different social backgrounds. Some are activist grandmothers in their rural communities. Some are young activists in rural areas or in cities. Some are keen on conservation of nature, and others represent the “environmentalism of the poor” and the indigenous, concerned with livelihood. Some belong to environmental or public health groups and have international contacts. Research starts by a survey of cases already recorded in the EJAtlas. with a typology of cases of women victimized in various ways in environmental conflicts. It will add some new 30 or 40 cases to the EJAtlas, in geographical areas not yet well covered. A period of fieldwork might be spent in some cases. The PhD researcher will then analyze all such cases.

Job position description.

A doctoral student with background in Ecology and/or Public Health interested in Political Ecology and Feminist Studies, from any nationality. Knowledge of English and Spanish or Portuguese, and preferably of other languages. Preferred area of specialization: Asia, Africa or Brazil.

Group Leader

  1. Title: Prof. Dr.
  2. Full name: Joan Martinez-Alier
  3. Email: joanmartinezalier@gmail.com
  4. Research project/ Research Group website (Url): EnvJustice project “A Global Movement for Environmental Justice: the EJAtlas” (ERC Advanced Grant to Prof. Joan Martinez-Alier, 2016-21)
  5. Website description: www.envjustice.orgwww.ejatlas.org